Exclusive: Senator Dodd says legislation may come after college admissions scandal

California lawmakers may explore potential legislation in response to a widespread college admissions cheating scandal, according to a state lawmaker.
State Sen. Bill Dodd, D-Napa, speaks to high school students at the Yolo County Youth Empowerment Summit on Saturday, March 16, 2019. Photo by Matthew Keys/Winters Express
State Sen. Bill Dodd, D-Napa, speaks to high school students at the Yolo County Youth Empowerment Summit on Saturday, March 16, 2019. Photo by Matthew Keys/Winters Express

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college admissions cheating scandal that netted felony charges for more than five dozen people, according to a state lawmaker. State Sen. Bill Dodd, D-Napa, addressed the topic during Saturday’s Youth Empowerment Summit at Woodland Community College. The Express was on location covering the event because several Winters High School students were in attendance. During a presentation to more than 100 students in attendance, Dodd called the college admissions cheating scandal “outrageous,” saying people were allegedly buying their way into prestigious schools while those sitting before him had to work hard to earn their spot. “Believe me, there will be some bills on this,” Dodd said. In an exclusive interview with the Express after his speech, Dodd reaffirmed his outrage over the scandal, saying he assumed lawmakers would respond with some kind of legislation. “There’s nothing that goes wrong in society that the California state legislature won’t want to try to change some policy to improve, particularly situations like that — that, in my mind, are horrific,” Dodd said. “People who have money should not be able to influence decisions on college admissions.” Dodd represents portions of Yolo County, including the Winters area, as well as parts of neighboring Solano and Napa counties. On Tuesday, federal prosecutors charged more than five dozen people with participating in a pay-to-play admissions scheme in which an education consulting company alleged accepted money to bribe college coaches and fix aptitude tests in order to secure placement at prestigious schools throughout the country. Dozens of parents — including actresses, business owners, a media executive and several individuals from Northern California — were accused in a lengthy criminal complaint of participating in the scheme.]]>

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