More funds for cat control

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We are excited to announce that we have received a grant to help fund Operation Creek Cat. The grant foundation, Community Cat Podcast, will match up to $1,000 of raised funds. Additionally, Yolo SPCA has agreed to match an additional $1,000; therefore, if we raise $2,000 from community and business donations, then we will double our money to $4,000. That will help TNR an additional 150-200 cats in Winters. All donations go directly to TNR (Trap, Neuter, Release).

The fundraising period runs until Feb. 28, and so far we have raised just over $1,000 from very generous donations and the help of some wonderful businesses. Ace Hardware, Monticello Veterinary Practice and Green River Taproom all have donation jars for your spare change.

In the past year, Operation Creek Cat has spayed/neutered and vaccinated over 134 adult feral cats in Winters and an additional 41 kittens were trapped and redirected to rescue programs for adoption. Despite these efforts, the need for more TNR still exists within Winters.

If you would like to donate, please direct funds to Yolo SPCA — Operation Creek Cat. P.O. Box 510, Davis, CA 95617 or yolospca.org (direct funds specifically to OCC). If donations are received before Feb. 28, your money will be doubled thanks to our grants.

KRISTIN TROTT/Operation Creek Cat

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10 comments
  1. Because outdoor, free-roaming cats have commonly been thought of as relatively innocuous additions to the landscape, it is generally considered appropriate for them to be let outside and legally allowed to roam free, leash-less and unattended. However, there is mounting evidence, as illustrated by a number of ecological studies and scientific papers, proving that contrary to conventional wisdom outdoor free-roaming cats do indeed pose a very significant threat to wildlife, in a number of various ways.

    Feral cats pose a threat to wildlife and a threat to themselves. They belong in homes, not on the landscape. They act as a disease vector (Toxoplasma gondii, hookworm, roundworm, FIV, rabies) to wildlife and also kill millions of native birds, amphibians, small mammals and reptiles, yet they are free of any of the ecological constraints that native, wild predators are forced to cope with.

    TNR is well-intentioned but thoroughly misguided and lacking in any kind of ecological awareness. It is also inhumane. Many of these cats end up sick with respiratory infections, hit by cars, eaten by coyotes, in the meantime harming native wildlife.

    Many of us think cats are cute too, and have compassion for them, but do not wish to sacrifice our native wildlife or the health of our native ecosystems for what are, in effect, invasive, non-native predators. TNR is not good for cats or for the environment.

  2. Because outdoor, free-roaming cats have commonly been thought of as relatively innocuous additions to the landscape, it is generally considered appropriate for them to be let outside and legally allowed to roam free, leash-less and unattended. However, there is mounting evidence, as illustrated by a number of ecological studies and scientific papers, proving that contrary to conventional wisdom outdoor free-roaming cats do indeed pose a very significant threat to wildlife, in a number of various ways.

    Feral cats pose a threat to wildlife and a threat to themselves. They belong in homes, not on the landscape. They act as a disease vector (Toxoplasma gondii, hookworm, roundworm, FIV, rabies) to wildlife and also kill millions of native birds, amphibians, small mammals and reptiles, yet they are free of any of the ecological constraints that native, wild predators are forced to cope with.

    TNR is well-intentioned but thoroughly misguided and lacking in any kind of ecological awareness. It is also inhumane. Many of these cats end up sick with respiratory infections, hit by cars, eaten by coyotes, in the meantime harming native wildlife.

    Many of us think cats are cute too, and have compassion for them, but do not wish to sacrifice our native wildlife or the health of our native ecosystems for what are, in effect, invasive, non-native predators. TNR is not good for cats or for the environment.

  3. Everybody seems to want to keep the maximum number of cats alive, but a lot of other animals have to die for that to happen. Whether you’re talking about how expensive their hunting habits are on the outdoors, for the animals that are slaughtered to go into their cans of cat food. I want reasoning adults in charge of animal control policy and enforcement.

  4. Everybody seems to want to keep the maximum number of cats alive, but a lot of other animals have to die for that to happen. Whether you’re talking about how expensive their hunting habits are on the outdoors, for the animals that are slaughtered to go into their cans of cat food. I want reasoning adults in charge of animal control policy and enforcement.

  5. As a property owner in Yolo County and tax payer in Davis, California, I am objecting to the release of feral cats into wildlife areas, parks, public spaces, watersheds, neighborhoods, playgrounds, or near schools, because neutering does not prevent the cats from predating the local wildlife or spreading their endo and ecto parasites. Anthony M in his comments below is spot on.

    Neuter release programs for feral cats are terribly misguided. Feral cats should be humanely euthanized if they are behaviorally unsuitable for rehoming. It is wonderful if you can help neuter feral cats and socialize them, but if not, euthanasia is humane for the cats as well as saves lives of the real local wildlife.

    1. Anyone who thinks that it’s a good idea to re-abandon cats once trapped should google “CDC Burden of Rabies”, “CDC toxoplamosis biology”, “Johns Hopkins toxoplasmosis”, “cat zoonoses” and “USGS National Wildlife Health Center Circular 1389 toxoplasmosis”. Then ask yourself why you consider the lives of humans and native wildlife to be so unimportant.

  6. As a property owner in Yolo County and tax payer in Davis, California, I am objecting to the release of feral cats into wildlife areas, parks, public spaces, watersheds, neighborhoods, playgrounds, or near schools, because neutering does not prevent the cats from predating the local wildlife or spreading their endo and ecto parasites. Anthony M in his comments below is spot on.

    Neuter release programs for feral cats are terribly misguided. Feral cats should be humanely euthanized if they are behaviorally unsuitable for rehoming. It is wonderful if you can help neuter feral cats and socialize them, but if not, euthanasia is humane for the cats as well as saves lives of the real local wildlife.

    1. Anyone who thinks that it’s a good idea to re-abandon cats once trapped should google “CDC Burden of Rabies”, “CDC toxoplamosis biology”, “Johns Hopkins toxoplasmosis”, “cat zoonoses” and “USGS National Wildlife Health Center Circular 1389 toxoplasmosis”. Then ask yourself why you consider the lives of humans and native wildlife to be so unimportant.

  7. TNR is sold to the public as a way to eventually get rid of cats but in practice the neutering rate is always to low and feeding the colonies bringings in breeding cats. TNR doctrine states there always must be cats and experience TNR advocates also say the numbers stay the same as does TNR track record.

  8. TNR is sold to the public as a way to eventually get rid of cats but in practice the neutering rate is always to low and feeding the colonies bringings in breeding cats. TNR doctrine states there always must be cats and experience TNR advocates also say the numbers stay the same as does TNR track record.

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