Winters makes it through the heat wave; expect more this summer

A heat wave enveloped the city of Winters last week, sending temperatures soaring past 100 degrees and creating conditions ripe for fire breakouts.
blank
Stock image via Pixabay

Support Local Journalism

LOGIN
REGISTER

A heat wave enveloped the city of Winters last week, sending temperatures soaring past 100 degrees and creating conditions ripe for fire breakouts.

The National Weather Service issued both an excessive heat watch and a red flag warning for hot, dry and windy conditions throughout the weekend.

The forecasts did not fail to disappoint: Temperatures were well above 100 degrees both Friday and Saturday before settling down to the mid-90s on Sunday.

Forecasters say this is just the beginning of what could be a very hot, dry summer ahead.

“Our averages tend to be in the 90s for July and August, and folks traditionally acclimate to that,” Michelle Mead, a forecaster with the National Weather Service, said in an interview. “When you get into the 100 degrees mark, that is pretty common in California, especially inland California.”

While fire season is typically between late spring and early fall, the hot, dry conditions coupled with breezy winds make the area especially susceptible to wildfires. Winters escaped the worst of the heat wave without a major fire outbreak, but the same was not true in neighboring Lake County where a wildfire broke out near the community of Clearlake Oaks about 70 miles northwest of Winters. The wildfire quickly grew to 10,000 acres and destroyed several structures.

The National Weather Service says people should avoid doing yard work with machinery, dragging chains that could spark fires and using fire safety skills with respect to campfires during heat waves, especially when the agency issues fire weather warnings. Mead also cautioned people not to throw cigarette butts out their windows, which is a common cause of vegetation fires.

During the heat wave, Mead says people should move outdoor plants to an alternative place with shade and water. For those going outdoors, Mead advises people drink plenty of water and reduce alcohol consumption: “Reducing alcohol intake is always a good thing — people don’t always realize it’s hot out there when they’ve consumed alcohol,” she said.

Exercising should be done in the morning or evening hours and avoided during the hottest part of the day, which is typically between 3 p.m. and 7 p.m., Mead said. The weather agency also encourages people to bring in pets and livestock if possible, or otherwise ensure they have plenty of shade and water.

Total
0
Shares
Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

Previous Article

Give me your best shot! Sunflower photo competition

Next Article

Business is blooming

Related Posts