Learn the history of crossing the Blue Ridge

Join the Winters History Project on Monday, Oct. 23, at 5-6 p.m. in the Margaret Parsons room at the Winters Community Library to hear Marc Hoshovsky tell how the entrepreneurial minds of the day solved this problem, enabling people to get from Sacramento Valley to Berryessa Valley and then on to Napa.
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“It was an ‘execrable toll-road,’ ‘rough, ragged and jagged,’ ‘the great mental and moral strain I endured.’ The toll-taker ‘enforced his demands for toll with a double-barrelled shotgun.’”

In the 1800s, the Blue Ridge Mountains rose 2,500 feet from the Sacramento Valley floor to the mountain peaks. They went for 40 miles running north and south from Vacaville to Rumsey, making travel difficult for those trying to get from the Sacramento Valley to the Berryessa Valley.

The need to transport goods, people, even mercury and borax from the mines became problematic. In 1863, a wagon-friendly road was built. Fortunately, the Yolo County side was free but unfortunately the Lake County side charged a toll. Maintaining the road was another problem, making it still difficult for those attempting to cross over.

All are welcome to join the Winters History Project on Monday, Oct. 23, at 5-6 p.m. in the Margaret Parsons room at the Winters Community Library to hear Marc Hoshovsky tell how the entrepreneurial minds of the day solved this problem, enabling people to get from Sacramento Valley to Berryessa Valley and then on to Napa.

 

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