Birds of Chicago bring good news with a groove to The Palms on Sunday, Nov. 25

Birds of Chicago will perform at The Palms Playhouse on Sunday, Nov. 25 at 7 p.m. Tickets are $22 ($18 with student ID). Daniel Rodriguez of Elephant Revival will open.
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Fronted by Allison Russell (left) and JT Nero, the Birds of Chicago will bring folk rock and groove-based Americana to The Palms Playhouse (13 Main St., Winters) on Sunday, Nov. 25 at 7 p.m. Tickets are $22 ($18 students).

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Birds of Chicago have been playing soul-inflected, groove-based Americana since 2012, gaining listeners and glowing reviews. With their new album, “Love in Wartime,” they are set to both confirm that roots world buzz and break on through to a wider audience across the world.  Birds of Chicago will perform at The Palms Playhouse on Sunday, Nov. 25 at 7 p.m. Tickets are $22 ($18 with student ID). Daniel Rodriguez of Elephant Revival will open. Built around the chemistry and fire between partners JT Nero and Allison Russell and their rock-steady band, Birds of Chicago’s “secular gospel” uses deep lyricism, close-knit harmonies, and gut-punch singing to create a sense of joy with an undertone of urgency. Russell and Nero played with different bands in the mid-aughts (acclaimed Canadian roots outfit Po’ Girl and JT and the Clouds) before finding their way to each other. Nero, the principle songwriter, found himself a transcendent vocal muse in Russell, who is a powerful writer in her own right. Nero, Russell and the Birds’ core band honed their chops on the road, playing 200 shows a year between 2013 and 2017. All that shaping and sharpening led them back to Chicago’s Electrical Audio in January of 2017 to begin recording. The first day in studio was Inauguration Day, and they didn’t need any more motivation than that to do what they came to do.  Recorded against a backdrop of bewilderment and deep divide, “Love in Wartime” is a rock and roll suite with a cinematic sweep. While the album acknowledges the difficulty of the time, it doesn’t dwell on it. Instead, the Birds find a way forward. Co-produced by Nero and Luther Dickinson (North Mississippi Allstars), the album has love as the undeniable through-line. “Any act of love is an act of bravery,” said Russell. “These songs are snapshots of covenants, big and small, of trust and understanding. We want to give people some good news, and we want them to be able to dance when they hear it.” Greg Kot of the Chicago Tribune wrote, “When Russell and Nero join their voices, the music leaps, it feels joyful despite the unrest that seeps through its cracks.” According to No Depression, “Birds of Chicago seduce us with their joyous, intimate, spare, rousing, soaring vocals and their hauntingly evocative lyrics.” “Love in Wartime,” the Birds’ fifth release, continues that sound that No Depression deemed “near perfect Americana.” The Birds attract a mix of indy rockers, NPRists, jam kids and folkies to their gigs, which alternate between moments of hushed attention and wild rock and soul abandon.  Said Nero, “A good show can send you back out into the night feeling – for at least a little while – that everything isn’t broken. Right now, we wanna dose out as much of that feeling as we can.” Colorado singer-songwriter Daniel Rodriguez, one of the founding members and lead songwriters of the transcendental folk band Elephant Revival, creates memorable, melodic hooks on his acoustic guitar to accompany his poetic and contemplative folk songs. According to Boulder Weekly, Rodriguez has “a timeless folk voice, deep and hearty, weathered but comforting.” Tickets are available at Pacific Ace Hardware in Winters, Armadillo Music in Davis, Davids’ Broken Note in Woodland, online via The Palms’ website and Eventbrite and at the door if not sold out. For more information, visit palmsplayhouse.com, birdsofchicago.com and drodriguezmusic.com.  ]]>

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