Election 2018: Measure P – Winters School District Bonds

Authorizes the Winters Joint Unified School District to sell $20 million in bonds that are repaid through an increase in property taxes.
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What this measure does: This measure allows the Winters Joint Unified School District to sell $20 million in bonds to fund certain school-related construction and refurnishing projects. The bonds would be repaid through property taxes with an estimated increase of about $60 in property taxes per $100,000 of the assessed value of a property. The maximum interest rate on the bonds would be 12 percent, and the bonds would have to be repaid within 25 years. The bonds would fund certain projects that were listed in a School Facilities Needs Analysis. Some of those projects include repairing or replacing leaky roofs, plumbing and sewer systems; constructing new classrooms; upgrading athletic fields; making facility improvements to increase energy efficiency; and modernizing classrooms, restrooms and other school facilities. The measure would require 55 percent voter approval in order to authorize the sale of these bonds. What supporters say: Supporters claim the extra $20 million is needed to increase the quality and standards of Winters classrooms and other school facilities. Supporters say, while similar bond measures were passed in recent years prior to this current election, the school district’s work is not done yet, and more money is needed to ensure these projects go forward. Supporters argue that the money collected through the issuance of these bonds would go toward upgrading facilities to safety and efficiency standards, and that no other money is currently allocated for these projects. Supporters contend that investing money into these projects will strengthen community and is a wise investment in property values. What opponents say: Opponents claim previous school bonds have resulted in property taxes rising with an athletic field to show for it. Opponents say property taxes that have been spent through the issuance of similar bonds have not been spent wisely. Impartial analysis conducted by Yolo County counsel said that the bonds are not enough by themselves to undergo some of the projects that are intended; for example, some of the projects may require matching funds from the state in order to be completed. County counsel also pointed out that the bonds cannot be used to pay the salaries of teachers or other school administration officials, and that the school district did not disclose other debts that may currently exist when it authorized the resolution seeking voter approval of the bonds. What a YES vote means: A YES vote means a voter wants to authorize the Winters Joint Unified School District to issue $20 million in property tax-backed bonds for certain projects identified by the school district in a recent School Facilities Needs Analysis. What a NO vote means: A NO vote means a voter does not want to authorize the Winters Joint Unified School District to issue $20 million in bonds for certain projects identified by the school district in a recent School Facilities Needs Analysis.]]>

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  1. The Winters school district is not following through on promises they made to taxpayers when they sold bonds in 2014 and again in 2016:
    “Supporters argue that the money collected through the issuance of these bonds would go toward upgrading facilities to safety and efficiency standards, and that no other money is currently allocated for these projects.”
    No money allocated for these projects? What happened to the bond money already approved by voters that was promised to go towards these projects? The school district has already collected millions of dollars in bond sales. Where did that money go? A high school football field and an unfinished technology building? Why didn’t they repair the leaky roofs?
    The school district is not being responsible with taxpayer money–this is your money. Vote No on Measure P.

  2. The Winters school district is not following through on promises they made to taxpayers when they sold bonds in 2014 and again in 2016:
    “Supporters argue that the money collected through the issuance of these bonds would go toward upgrading facilities to safety and efficiency standards, and that no other money is currently allocated for these projects.”
    No money allocated for these projects? What happened to the bond money already approved by voters that was promised to go towards these projects? The school district has already collected millions of dollars in bond sales. Where did that money go? A high school football field and an unfinished technology building? Why didn’t they repair the leaky roofs?
    The school district is not being responsible with taxpayer money–this is your money. Vote No on Measure P.

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